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. on the campaign trail we heard governor romney say he supported a green card to the every math and science graduate from our university. why should we educate some of the best minds on earth and say sorry, no room in the u.s. economy for you? it makes no sense. they go away and compete against us rather than innovating and creating jobs here. then i took a closer look at what the republicans are actually proposing. they haven't turned the corner at all. in fact, they haven't even stepped out of their houses. they certainly didn't learn anything from the last election. the stem visa bill on the house floor this week was actually voted down in september. it was introduced with a few changes and no consultation with democrats. i want to find a bipartisan solution on immigration. i'm committed to it. i know it won't be easy. they say a journey of 1,000 miles begins with just one step. the problem is my colleagues on the other side of the aisle want to take one step and have the democrats travel the other 999.9 miles. certainly this bill isn't even a step it's a shell game. it's the same proble
are absolute low right. what you see happening right now, dana is the art of politics and verse us the science of good policy. we need to move away from campaign mode and stimulate economic growth and wealth expansion and not wealth distribution. when the president is focused on the wealth distribution politic which thomas jefferson and hamilton lincoln talked against we are headed on down the wrong path. more people are pushed to food stamps and more people pushed to poverty and unemployment situation is going to get worse. we have seen that recently with the weekly job claims numbers coming out. >> and one of the things that are part of the debate and since the carter administration is the need to reform entitlements and make social security is set on a path and available to children and grandchildren that are born today. >> it seems to me that cram -- congressman that entitlements are not part of the discussion but do you think it should be. >> it has to be. it is troubling when the president is ordering the expansion of government and increase of tax rates, but he's not talking about the t
-gay industry did nothing but provide me and my family with false lies mass ka raiding as science. >> representative jackie spear joins me now live from capitol hill. congresswoman, thank you so much for joining us. my first question to you, why not just introduce legislation to ban it? why the nonbinding resolution? >> it is a state function to regulate professions, so it is incumbent on the states to look at the scope of practice within professions and determine whether certain practices are appropriate or not. the american psychological association and the american psychiatric association has said for more than 40 years that this is junk science. that there is no science that supports this conversion therapy or reparative therapy. so, this is an effort to put a spotlight on the issue and then from a federal point of view, i want to make sure that the taxpayer dollars aren't being spent on providing the services when they are not held to be scientifically effectively. >> okay, okay. we have got that. i want to hear more from young people at the news conference who went through c
one after another individuals cross receiving their masters and doctorate degrees in science, in math, engineering. the amazing thing is one after another had names that were almost imupon to pronounce -- impossible to pronounce in some cases, and clearly the majority of these engineers and scientists were going -- came from other countries and were being told they must return to them. he made the statement in his op-ed that in fact at the end rather than just a diploma, they should be given a diploma and green card. mr. speaker, i agree with thomas friedman on this subject. for each person we welcome to america with one of these high degrees, we create jobs, net jobs. we create opportunity for expansion of the kinds of businesses that, in fact, americans are prepared to work in, but often we do not have enough engineers, scientists, or math professionals. this shortage, particularly at the masters and doctorate level, is well documented. this is not something in which republicans and democrats are on different sides. this is something which we agree to it. there is some controversy,
of science. >> this is something that leadership needs to talk about. as a storyteller i know we have to get the story out there. climate change is happening. we immediately have to start transforming our economy to renewable energy. that's totally duible. we can run everything we have right now off existing technology from the wind and the sun and renewable energy. the second thing, it's an incredible economic benefit and economic engine to this area. there are community centers out on the rockaways that have power because greenpeace pulled up with a solar array on the back of a truck and that distributed generated energy helps people. >> eliot: it is unfortunately an event to drive home the reality of what you can do at a moment of distress when you need to find alternative energy sources. you've done that. i want to pivot a little bit. the occupy movement has morphed into something different. it's changed it's imagery and providing real services to real people. is that going to be a continueing transformation? is this a new cause for occupy. >> one would argue that they were a disaster or
national intelligence community. in 2011, the defense science board provided the secretary of defense guidance for a government-wide approach to preparing for the effects of climate change, concluding that -- and i quote -- "climate change will only grow in concern for the united states and its security interests." the 2010 quadrennial defense review by the department of defense noted khroeufp as one of the things -- climate change as one of the things that -- quote -- "will play important roles in the future security environment." and the white house's 2010 national security strategy stated -- quote -- "climate change threatens the security of regions and the health and safety of the american people." going back to 2008, there thomas fingar, then deputy chair for analysis said -- and i quote -- "global climate change will have wide-ranging implications for u.s. national security interests for the next couple of years." in a report requested by the c.i.a., the national research council wrote this year that -- quote -- "while climate change alone does not cause conflict, it may act as
. >> clayton: in new york city, women waiting until they're 50 to get married or have kids, beyond science or-- >> right, right. >> clayton: is that a problem? and is marriage the traditional idea of marriage suffering because women want to go further and further into the workplace? >> the idea of traditional marriage is suffering for lot of reason. the article, wasn't the whole kit and caboodle, one aspect that i was passing on, if you will. there's certainly more to the issue, the purpose of my book, how to choose a husband. this was sort after teaser. but the whole attitude for marriage in general, for young people in particular is such a negative one and that's really the premise that i'm concerned about because when you start out thinking so negatively and taught things like never depend on a man and postpone marriage as long as possible. not that there's anything wrong with postponing it, but with that attitude you're probably going to have a self-fulfilling prophesy, but turn it around. this is a good thing. marriage, family-- >> governor huckabee on our show disagreed a little. >> oka
and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. (vo) always outspoken, now >> on my next show, fashion savant carson kressley goes from dancing with the stars to dishing with moi, on say anything. [ music ] >> bill: here we go, monday morning, focusing on the one person standing in the way of any fix of the fiscal cliff and that is john boehner. time for him to lead. john boehner ought to go to his caucus and say, hey, they won. we lost. we now look like a bunch of clowns because 98% of americans are going to get a tax cut, a continued tax cut on january 1st unless we stop it. and why should we block that? bill kristol who is as conservative as you can get, former chief of staff for dan quail, publisher of "the weekly standard" weekly on fox news, he said after the election on november 11th, he laid it out there. >> float new ideas. let's have a serious debate. don't scribek scream and yell. it won't kill country if we raise taxes on millionaires. i don't sundays why republicans don't
for education and train science and research. >> any republican who buys this is a fool. republicans have stood for one thing statistically that held them. they are the low tax party. the other guys want to tax to match their reckless spending. if they give it up now in return for nothing, obama wins and high wins big. i understand why the democrats are doing this. they imagine that republicans have no bargaining power today . i say that it is true if republicans resist they will take the blame and that will help democrats in the congress. but obama's never running again. he doesn't care who gets the blame. he is the president and a blame duck. he wants a successful second term. if it starts by going over the cliff it starts with second recession and wrecked second term. >> steve: that's why the president said i would be willing to do anything to get a deal. >> gretchen: it is not a deal. this is what the american public needs to know. this is raising taxos successful people and reducing taxes on the middle class. that is not a deal folks. they will waste your taxpayer dollars and overspend and
provide green cards pr those skilled in science and technology and math. foreign internationals who have earned degrees from an american university can stay here and use their skills to improve the american workforce. sounds like a great idea, right? sure, but it does so at the expense of other immigrants. and as "the new york times" points out, it eliminates another visa category entirely. the visas set aside for people from countries with low immigration rates to the united states. so the 55,000 stem visas would come at the expense of 55,000 diversity visas. that's a zero sum gain. the elimination of diversity visas would primary affect immigrants from african countries. but despite the discriminatory nature of the bill, republicans insist it's going to create jobs and they are calling out the democrats opposition to the legislation. >> once again, the house is taking the lead on legislation that is going to help create jo jobs. >> we believe as this was the first step forward in terms of trying to address the need for modernization in our visa laws. >> the democrats had two years to d
the rest of science, we'll apply it, follow where the data leav donaytonon' data leads, we'll leave the politics after the door. >> and sometimes this is contaminated. the pure drug can cause problems, people can actually die from drinking too much water. but in a controlled setting which is what we're talking about here, the evidence does seem to suggest it can be safe. similar studies are under way in europe and canada, and the doctor is studying the treatment to combat veterans, firefighters and police officers. dr. sanjay gupta, cnn, reporting. >> very interesting, dr. gupta, thank you. >>> and we're celebrating everyday people changing the word. up next, you will hear from a texas man who builds homes for wounded veterans. coming up. cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant,
, no matter what happens which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense from td ameritrade. >> eliot: i'm back with dan gross of "newsweek" and the daily beast. brian beutler and eric bates. i want to start out with the financial trend financial packs that i mentioned earlier in the show. dan, would that be a bad idea? a good idea? something that we should think about and hold in reserve for another day. >> i actually think it's a good idea. the economists say if you want something less of something tax it more. if we want less speculation and less out of control training by these crazy machines that are doing hundreds of thousands of trades a day to capture a fraction of a penny in economic gains, taxes it would discourage those and raise a fair amount of money in a fairly painless way in trading. >> eliot: would this be an useful compromise point? you want the capital markets to be liquid. you want to allocate capital efficiently among businesses and he cansectors. all of that used to happen before the hedge fund that were driven by computers. you could butt a transaction tax it on
they are breaking up families. the republicans are trying to promote for science, technology and engineering and math, whether it's a high skilled visa or a low skilled advice a whether it's farm workers, domestic workers who clean hotepal this is all immigrant labor, and this apalo has an economic component in addition to the fact that many of their churches are telling them we can no longer side with this anti-immigration position. so it is changing out from under them and i think they are going to look for a way that they can change policy without a political backlash. joons we will be talking more about the upcoming elections a little bit later in the hour. a.b. stoddard, thank you. >> thank you. jenna: serious new concerns about a deteriorating situation in syria. why turkey says the bashar al-assad regime may be coming for it next and what our nato ally says it needs to protect its own people. we have a live report just ahead. [ man ] ring ring... progresso this reduced sodium soup says it mahelp lower cholesterol, how does it work? you just he to eat it as part of your heart healthy d
in the world of make- believe could quickly become quite real. >> that is very cool. the science is in the special fabric. so you don't need a power source to make it work. so any soldier, even in the most remote location could quickly put it on and put it to work and disappear. >> wow. >>> a mixed day on wall street with money disappearing. the dow was up big. not the nasdaq. dow was up 83. s&p up 2. nasdaq down 23. let's go to new york, where alexis christoforous has tonight's cbs money watch update. >> reporter: stocks rallied as corporate news overshadowed concerns about the fiscal cliff. citigroup plans to cut 11,000 jobs as the bank's new ceo looks to save money. the cuts amount to about 4% of siti's -- sity's -- citi's work group. and it includes closing some branches. u.s. companies added fewer workers in november. bartly because super storm sandy shut down many businesses. including factories and retailers. they will get a better picture of the job market friday. shares of apple fell as much as 4% after a research firm raised its
'll be joint staffers who are doing the real science and math on this on exactly what formations, what capabilities, and, therefore, how many civilians and military need to remain. i think that if you go to one end of the spectrum and go with just a few thousand soldiers, that's not enough to really secure yourself or do either too well. i think that's what my own research is doing. talking to a lot of smarter people in the week here in the capital region. if you go very large, you could run the risk of having the security forces from afghanistan become too reliant in those areas upon us because we're there taking care of them. i think they can be mitigated, i really do. there's got to be a really good, i think, science to exactly how you approach troops to task based upon the missions that we're given. that really is what needs to happen militarily. economically, we've got to stay informed in the -- invested in the region. you've got to have security forces. it's a sustainable force that works for afghans in the outyears. at the same time, diplomatically you've got to continue reconci
colleagues in recognizing chairman ralph hall for his tenure as chairman of the house science committee. during his service, he reached acrong the -- across the aisle and forged bipartisan coalitions to support important legislation and no program, in my view, has benefited more if his bipartisan commitment than the united states space program. representative hall has been an especially strong voice for our nation's human space flight program which has benefited not only tbs and florida but propoled our nation on the path of unprecedented scientific and technological advancement. we can all learn a lot from our colleagues. congressman hall leads by example. he's well known for calling a spade a spade. his word truly is his bond and you can always take that to the bank. advancing our nation's human space flight program has been a hallmark for chairman hall. as we look out at america's next general riggs of explorers, space is their destiny and he'll help ensure that they reach it. ralph, there's a lot of work to do and i'm truly honored by the opportunity to serve with you an get it done
in fisheries and wildlife science from kansas state university in 1999, and her masters degree in biology from fort hayes state university in kansas. she loved the outdoors and was said to be at peace in nature. margaret anderson was living her dream, working with her husband at mount rainier national park as a united states park ranger. her duties were not confined to patrolling, but ranged from supervision of snowplow areas to medical coordination and instruction for her fellow staff members. anderson was described by her colleagues as a candid and honest co-worker who could always bring a smile to your face. on new year's day, anderson blocked the road with her patrol car to hinder the escape of a man who crashed through a checkpoint. little did she know at that time that the man was a suspect in an earlier shooting that wounded four people. the suspect shot at her while she was still blocking the road with her patrol car and she was fatally wounded. mr. speaker, national park ranger margaret anderson made the ultimate sacrifice in the line of duty. i urge passage of this bill to honor her
that we can get this done is because the reality is it is not rocket science -- we can get it done. mr. chairman, whether it is our current chairman, john larson, or our future chairman -- whoever gets to lead this caucus knows we have got an enthusiastic group of committed representatives of this country ready to get the job done. >> questions? >> congressman, if republicans are willing to step up and raise revenue, will house democrats provide votes to cut benefits to programs like medicare and medicaid? >> let me say that clearly, as gene sperling was sent today, the president is willing to look at what they're going to put forward in terms of revenues, but that has not been forthcoming, shall we say. with the president has been very clear is in terms of the impact on beneficiaries and beneficiaries are the people who are the recipients of medicaid, medicare, and social security -- we believe at most would agree that social security is not responsible for the deficit and should not be on at the table for discussion. with regard to the so-called entitlements -- i come from hartford,
, is really the art of politics, versus the science of good policy and i think we need to move away from campaign mode and we need to do the things that are going to stimulate economic growth and wealth expansion, not wealth distribution, when the president continues to be focused on the wealth distribution politics, which is something that president thomas jefferson talked against and also, abraham lincoln, we're going to continue to see greater problems with our economy, more people push toward food stamps, more people pushed towards poverty and our unemployment situation is going to get worse and we have seen that recently with some of the numbers, the weekly job claims numbers coming out. >> one of the things that has been a part of this debate and really has been something that's been talked about since the carter administration, is the need to reform entitlements, to make sure that, for example, social security could be set on a path so that it could be available to children and grandchildren being born today. and it seems to me though, congressman that maybe entitlements is not ev
, prosthetic arms and legs, it is amazing what science and medicine is doing for these young people .. but nobody should estimate, underestimate the magnitude of the rehabilitation challenge and the courage that it takes, day in and day out to try and come back from these terrible wounds and that is where there is not enough we can do for these kids. >> rose: are we over stretched? >> i don't think so. i think we were over stretched at the end of 2006 .. and particularly in the early months of 2007, during the surge in iraq, i think one of the hardest decisions i made, maybe the hardest decision that i made as secretary was extending the length of deployments in iraq and afghanistan from twelve months to 15 months, and we did it for about a year and a half. and two years, and the alternative was to cut short their time at home. so if they were only to serve twelve months in the theatre then they might only be home for nine months or eight months or something, and so the recommendation of all of the generals and others was do the 15 and let them have the year at home, but there is no
him, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. rich, chewy caramel rolled up in smooth milk chocolate. don't forget about that payroll meeting. rolo.get your smooth on. also in minis. at cepacol we've heard people are going to extremes to relieve their sore throats. oh, okay, you don't need to do that. but i don't want any more of the usual lozenges and i want new cooling relief! ugh. how do you feel? now i'm cold. hmm. this is a better choice. new cepacol sensations cools instantly, and has an active ingredient that stays with you long after the lozenge is gone. ahhh. not just a sensation sensational relief. [ ♪ theme music ♪ ] [ ♪ music ♪ ] >> announcer: ladies and gentlemen, it's "the stephanie miller show"." [ ♪ music ♪ ] >> stephanie: yahoo, it is "the stephanie miller show." happy friday six minutes after the hour, 1-800-steph-12 the phone number, www. www.stephaniemiller.com the website. and speaking of sexy liberal. [ ♪ music ♪ ] yeah yeah. ♪ fug
guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> john mcafee is a famous pioneer of anti-virus software but authorities in belize want to question him about the killing of his neighbor. nobody saw him until he contacted cnn's martin savage and agreed to an interview that was anything but normal. >> reporter: the search to find john mcafee started here at the airport. it began with three simple words. sorry i'm late. a prearranged code word to let me know i'd met the person that would take me to mcafee. what followed was a drive road through winding, twisting streets and then we get in to a parking lot, get in to another vehicle and drive off again. this time with switchbacks, u-turns and back alleys. clearly meant to confuse us as well as anyone following. and then, there we were. face to face. observation number one. with john afee, there's no such thing as a simple answer. you are john mcafee? >> i think so, yes. i am john mcafee. >> reporter: he seemed nervous, anxious. are you afraid? >> wou
an impact on brain function. as science and medicine progressed, society has come to understand mental illness with clarity. senator conrad and crapo wanted to strike the word lunatic from the united states code. i thank them for their effort and i encourage my colleagues to join me in supporting this bill to modernize or codified law to reflect the 21st century understanding of mental illness. and i reserve the balance of my time. . the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from virginia. mr. scott: i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. scott: this bill eliminates outdated references in the u.s. code that stigmatize individuals with mental illness. this legislation easily passed the senate with strong bipartisan support. the bill eliminates the word lunatic from the -- several sections of the united states code in order for our code to reflect meanings which are much more appropriate and up to date in the 21st century. in the past members of congress on both sides of the aisle have worked
income and if you don't have income you can't pay income taxes. that's not rocket science. got to get folks back to work and more, mr. speaker. if you're a family of four and you're earning $30,000 a year, you can't afford to pay the bills of this country in the same way that someone making $200,000 a year can. that's ok. we understand that. that's why there are graduated rates in the income tax code. some people 10%. some people pay 15%. some people pay 25%. some people pay in the 30's. the more you have the more we think you're able to contribute, but here we are in what every american economist would agree is one of the most dire economic circumstances of our time and what i hear described as leadership from the president is don't change anything for the 80%. in fact, spend more on the 80% and go tap that last 1% to pay all the bills. the top 1% are already paying all the bills. . this chart i would say demonstrates a moral imperative that we have the and grapple with as american citizens, as members of the greatest self-ruling nation the history of the world, what we have already
for consumers of pork. justified fears or junk science. bill: we'll see you then. a red kettle controversy, what is the problem with the salvation army? are you receiving a payout from a legal settlement or annuity over 10 or even 20 years? call imperial structured settlements. the experts at imperial can convert your long-term payout into a lump sum of cash today. campbell's has 24 new soups that will make it drop over, and over again. ♪ from jammin' jerk chicken, to creamy gouda bisque. see what's new from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. martha: this is a crazy story, a shooting over a cellphone video in southern california. oakland police say this a couple recorded a car driving erratic lee and the driver noticed that he was being filmed, on the cellphone an pulled up alongside and pointed a gun and demanded the video back. the couple drove away, but the suspects fold and one of the gunmen then gotten to the victim's car and fought with the husband who managed to kick the guy out but not before the gunman fired a shot. nobody was hit thank goodness but boy this is -- there is a l
, science, and research. now, i know some of this may sound familiar to you because we talked a lot about this during the campaign. this shouldn't be a surprise to anybody. this was a major debate in the presidential campaign and in congressional campaigns all across the country and a clear majority of americans, not just democrats but also a lot of republicans and a lot of independents agreed we should have a balanced approach to deficit reduction that doesn't hurt the economy and doesn't hurt middle class families. and i'm glad to see, if you've been reading the papers lately, that more and more republicans in congress seem to be agreeing with this idea that we should have a balanced approach. so if both parties agree we should not raise taxes on middle class families, let's begin our work with where we agree. the senate's already passed a bill that keeps income taxes from going up on middle class families. democrats in the house are ready to vote for that same bill today. if we can get a few house republicans to agree as well, i'll sign this bill as soon as congress sends it my way. i'
'm a nurse. i believe in the power of science and medicine. but i'm also human. and i believe in stacking the deck. [ female announcer ] to nurses everywhere, thank you, from johnson & johnson. bp has paid overthe people of bp twenty-threeitment to the gulf. billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. home of the legendary grand prix circuit. the perfect place to bring the all-new cadillac ats to test the 2.0-liter turbo engine. [ engine revs ] ♪ [ derek ] 272 horsepower. the lightest in its class. the cadillac ats outmatches the bmw 3 series. i cannot believe i have ended the day not scraping some red paint off on these barriers. ♪ [ male announcer ] the all-new cadillac ats. >>> welcome back, everyone. i'm randi kaye. here are five stories that we're watching
of political science. they all said, that is really fundamental. [laughter] i discovered a little bit about how to be persuasive in the world.al million -- as cheng li's recognizes in his book, how to deal with the legal system may be the new government in china's biggest problem and the one they are least equipped to handle. we are all taking different slices looking at this reality. bill has given us some good perspectives. i like what he said about the impact of history. today, i want to look at three aspects briefly. the first, i will give the most time to. i think it has the least analysis in the public domain. it is the relationship of the party to the legal system. how should the party be structured to deal with the legal system? how should tea party's authoritative agency, the political middle -- how should the party's up the ortega agency that deals with -- political agency deal with the political system? as one of the litmus tests for the new chinese leadership. in order to provide a different perspective that relates to the historical and contemporary comparative law, i want to menti
, the bringing in a science and technology. you are a world bank guy. you went to harvard and dell was science and technology. here we are was tremendous knowledge in these fields. we talk about helping democracies. how do you see that from not only indicating these villages but scholarships and others, whether it is the french, the canadians, the brits, so that there are always for educational, the empowerment of women come are raising their status, inclusion. the american bar society and all those groups. what do you think about that? is it such that unless you have big muscular defense, big muscular foreign aid? i don't think america will ever be a wimp in anything, but i have an additional school of thought. what do you think? what could help that in america? >> thank you. generally, to speak a very frankly and what you have requested, the support of law enforcement in colombia has been helpful. that is a first step. as you said coming in several points to develop. increasing security capabilities and increasing the state's capability to promote human rights. in a case like ours, we have h
and being ready, no matter what happens which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense from td ameritrade. we have a big, big hour and the i.q. will go way up. how are you ever going to solve the problem if you don't look at all of the pieces? >>tv and radio talk show host stephanie miller rounds out current's morning news block. >>you're welcome current tv audience for the visual candy. >>sharp tongue, quick whit and above all, politically direct. >>you just think there is no low they won't go to. oh, no. if al gore's watching today... [ ♪ theme ♪ ] >> announcer: this is the "full court press." the "bill press show." live on your radio and on current tv. >> bill: hey, it is 14 minutes before the top of the hour here on this wednesday morning. november 28. before we get back to the issues of the day for the last two days, you have heard at this time of the program in our programs both me and stephanie miller ask for your help for the salvation army. contest we've been running here on current tv. we are no longer going to be part of t
it is superstition but it is not like there is a science to winning the lottery. >> you don't get a better chance by doing quick pick. >> bill: let's hear the numbers here. i want to check here. okay. >> the number five. next up is number 23. here is a picture of ricky la grange from louisiana. he won $1 million. after that, we've got the number 22. round it out tonight with the number 29. all right now for tonight's winning powerball number and for that over half a billion jackpot, it is the number 6. cyprian. >> bill: i had a 22 somewhere and a 29 somewhere. if i could put them together. cyprian got the powerball number. >> bill: he got some dough. >> a couple of bucks. >> if you just hit the powerball, it is $2 i think. >> bill: so there were winners in arizona and missouri. red states. this is not fair. it is a conspiracy. >> that's not change we can believe in. >> bill: did you get anything at all? >> no. i'm going to double check later. i just go to the counter and scan them. >> bill: i'll never play po
, with the rest of science, we'll apply the rigor, we'll follow where the data leaves. we'll leave our politics at the door. >> point out that none of this means that street ecstasy is safe, apart from being illegal, you don't know what you're getting. it's often contaminated. pure mdma can cause a higher body temperature, it can cause dehydration. there's also cases where people overcompensate and actually die from drinking too much water. but in a controlled setting, which is what we're talking about here, the evidence does seem to suggest that it can be safe. similar studies are under way in europe and canada and midhoffer is halfway through a study offering this treatment to combat veterans, firefighters and police officers. dr. sanjay gupta, cnn, reporting. >> fascinating. possibly opening up the mind. well, you can watch more of sanjay's fascinating report on the ptsd study this morning, "dr. sanjay gup "dr. sanjay gupta" airs this weekend saturday and sunday mornings. >>> with thousands loo s losing jobs, some twinkie execs will get bonuses. oh, let me guess --ou see this? more washingto
've reviewed it and the results look promising. it's like the rest of science. we'll follow where the data leads. we'll leave our politics at the door. >> point out that none of this means street ecstasy is safe. apart from being illegal, you don't know what you're getting. it's often contaminated. it can cause a higher body temperature, dehydration and also cases where people overwhen sate and actually die from drinking too much water. but in a controlled setting, which is what we're talking about here, the evidence does seem to suggest that it can be safe. similar studies are underway in europe and canada. and he's halfway through a study offering this treatment to combat veterans, firefighters and police officers. dr. sanjay gupta, cnn reporting. >> make sure you tune into dr. sanjay gupta this weekend saturday afternoon at 4:30 eastern and sunday morning at 7:30 eastern. >>> dozens of fast food workers protest and walk off the job. up next, find out what workers from mcdonald's, kfc and burger king are demanding. tonight our guest, thomas sargent. nobel laureate in economics, and one o
. caller: c-span could put on actual science. i think there is a lot of magical thinking on the part of democrats here. first of all, they are assuming if they raise the taxes on this one%, it will not affect the jobs and the companies that they work for. nor would it affect the customers they have. what are the percentages of the most important job creators around? how did you identify them? they had no clue. i think the other aspect of magical thinking is that in the noise and the signal, nate silver pointed out previously a 12% rise in gdp might ake for a 2% rise in employment. in 2005, we got 3.5 million jobs lost. it is a fantasy to believe that the president's spending is going to make employment rise more. recently, there has been an article by a harvard university law professor who says if you are going to do this thing, it is more important to make all the fiscal cuts them back as greece and spain know, when people do not trust your debt, weak issue too much debt. if everyone heads to the door like china and other is, our debt is really going to go up. host: should the raisi
. jekyll technology parts. >> science, technology, engineering and math are fundamental to the growth of the economy and the united states obviously has work to do, my oldest daughter is doing her doctorate in math. there's a substantial contribution to national security in any case. with respect to the dr. jekyll and mr. hyde bit, economic growth is fundamental and innovation is the key engine for that and freedom is the foundation for that. i think we will see this play out in interesting ways globally including within china, and as we work to have a very open system economically and take advantage of technology, we also need to look at what needs to be done to deal with the threats of not just cyber but biotech and so on and look at doing that in partnership, and the partners we look at, and a substantial conversation about the rules of the road in cyberspace, we do that with many others, a fundamental issue. >> got a little bit from global security, the issue of the islands is primarily an issue of energy, and we are seeing it all over the world today, we don't have good mechanism
times the total investment made of r&d, science and education. if we permit that to happen we are assured a slow-growth crisis that is what will happen if we don't do anything. mike, please takeover. >> i don't claim to be an economics expert. but from the national security standpoint i have felt for years not just the health of our economy around the world but those that generate positive outcome and from the defense standpoint as pointed out if said that continues to grow it will continue to eat at us and when you put in good time bomb of the sequestration it was supposed to be so heinous that congress would never permit it to happen but yet we're on the verge andover what we have been fighting over the last decade at a time when there is clearly increasing pressure on the defense budget and i have said it should pay its fair share. with the media impact to get to a part of your question and i worry about the acceleration to create a hollow force very rapidly. and the president does what he says he will he takes it off the books of any cuts with the totality focused on a ver
have the greatest colleges in the world and who develop expertise in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, in areas that might have an immediate impact on some of the most important growth industries as we look to the future. when we say to them, if you get your degree here, you got to go to your home country for several years and then apply to come back to this country in order to work here, but canada will allow you right away. other countries will allow you right away. or go back to your own country and compete with the united states economy and your emerging economic fwrothe in your home country. i saw this very, very closely at hand when i saw one of our major technology companies actually build a plant just over the border in canada, utilizing a core of those people who had graduated from american colleges, had come from foreign countries and were immediately accepted into canada and then canada was able to build a work force of about 1,000 people around a core of probably no more than 100 people that would have been required to go back to their own countries from the u
energy and commerce committee. science is clear. cutting carbon emissions over the long term is key to reducing the risk of extreme weather. so i thank you for the opportunity to testify, and look forward to working together to help our fellow americans feel from hurricanes and, to ensure that we're all better prepared for similar storms of the future. thank you so much. >> thank you represented. and i would go -- welcome. >> thank you, madam chairman. very much appreciate the invitation to speak before this committee today. i am very proud to represent staten island and brooklyn. staten island was one of the hardest hit areas of all new york city. i was on the ground from the moment the storm started. the amount of devastation that i saw was unimaginable. 24 staten islanders lost their lives. families lost everything. homes were literally torn off their foundations. some collapsed. large boats, yachts were scattered deepened the neighborhoods piled up on two peoples homes. more than 100,000 were without power for weeks. people slept in a cold, damp home, and for his of to move to a
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